Please click on the year below to view course content for the IT & Business Faculty.

Learning Director
Mr Anakwa -


Faculty Introduction:

Students follow the ICT & Computer Science Curriculum in year 7. This is intended to give students both a broad range of ICT and computing skills to ensure that by the end of Key Stage 3 all pupils can use ICT securely, creatively and independently, are confident enough to keep their skills up to date and are able to transfer and apply those skills in different situations.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

The topics covered in year 8 include Internet Communication and E-Safety, Multimedia Presentation, Desktop Publishing, Spread-sheet modelling and Sequencing instructions using Scratch.

Assessment:

Students are assessed at the end of each unit of work covered to determine their National Curriculum Level and given individual targets to improve.

The assessment is based on a set of criteria that ensures that students can demonstrate a clear understanding of the key theoretical and practical concepts, and are able to transfer those skills across other subjects and in the real world scenario.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to help students to practice their IT skills and complete homework.


Faculty Introduction:

Students follow the ICT & Computer Science Curriculum in year 8. This is intended to give students both a broad range of ICT and computing skills to ensure that by the end of Key Stage 3 all pupils can use ICT securely, creatively and independently, are confident enough to keep their skills up to date and are able to transfer and apply those skills in different situations.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

The topics covered in year 8 include Research and Presenting information, Programming in Scratch and Python, Web Development and Databases.

Assessment:

Students are assessed at the end of each unit of work covered to determine their National Curriculum Level and given individual targets to improve.

The assessment is based on a set of criteria that ensures that students can demonstrate a clear understanding of the key theoretical and practical concepts, and are able to transfer those skills across other subjects and in the real world scenario.

Homework:

Homework is set at least once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to help students to practice their IT skills and complete homework.


Faculty Introduction:

Students follow the ICT & Computer Science Curriculum in year 9. This is intended to give students both a broad range of ICT and computing skills and the needed foundation for the BTEC –Vocational and Computer Science options in KS4.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

The topics covered include, Computer Hardware, Advanced Spread-sheets, HTML-Web Design, Relational Databases and Programming using Python. These topics engage learners to take responsibility for their own learning and help them develop skills that are essential for both academic and the modern-day workplace.

Assessment:

Students are assessed at the end of each unit of work covered to determine their National Curriculum Level and given individual targets to improve. The assessment is based on a set of criteria that ensures that students can demonstrate a clear understanding of the key theoretical and practical concepts, and are able to transfer those skills across other subjects and in the real world scenario.

Homework:

Homework is set at least once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to help students to practice their IT skills and complete homework.


Faculty Introduction:

The Computer Science course is principally a 2-year academic course which gives students a real, in-depth understanding of how computer technology works.

The course will develop critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving skills through the study of computer programming, giving students a fun and interesting way to develop these skills, which can be transferred to other subjects and even applied in day-to-day life.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Unit A451: Computer systems and programming

  • This unit covers the body of knowledge about computer systems on which the examination will be based.

Unit A452: Practical investigation

  • An investigative computing task, chosen from a list provided by OCR, which assesses the following: research, technical understanding, analysis of problem, historical perspective, use of technical writing skills, recommendations/evaluation.

Unit A453: Programming project

Students will need to:

  • Understand standard programming techniques
  • Be able to design a coded solution to a problem including the ability to:
  • Develop suitable algorithms
  • Design suitable input and output formats
  • Identify suitable variables and structures
  • dentify test procedures.

  • Create a coded solution fully annotating the developed code to explain its function

  • Test their solution:
  • To show functionality
  • To show how it matches the design criteria
  • Identifying successes and any limitations.

Assessment:

  • Unit A451: Computer systems and programming (1 hour 30 minutes, Written paper, 80 marks)
  • Unit A452: Practical investigation (Controlled assessment Investigative task. OCR-set scenario with a choice of research tasks, 45 marks)
  • Unit A453: Programming project (Controlled assessment Programming task. Design, develop and test a solution to a problem within the OCR-set scenario, 45 marks)

Homework:

Homework is set once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to help students to practice their IT and Computing skills and to make progress on their coursework.


Faculty Introduction:

Students in Year 10 follow the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 course in ICT. During the course students develop a broad range of ICT skills which they can use across subjects and in a variety of situations in post-16 and in the world of work. Students are encouraged to work independently to produce solutions to problems using a wide range of ICT software packages.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

One mandatory and one optional topics are covered in year 10:

  • Creating Digital Animations(optional )
  • The Online World (mandatory)

The optional unit require students to analyse a problem, plan and design, implement and test a digital product solution.

Assessment:

The mandatory unit is externally assessed through an on-screen test. The optional unit is however internally assessed and externally moderated. Students produce a portfolio of evidence, which is regularly assessed.

Students who are successful achieve the equivalent of a full GCSE which is graded at Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit, Level 2 Distinction, Level 2 Distinction*, Level 1 and Unclassified at the end of year 11.

Homework:

Homework is set once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to help students to practice their IT skills and to make progress on their coursework.


Faculty Introduction:

Students in Year 11 follow the Edexcel BTEC Level 2 course in ICT. During the course students develop a broad range of ICT skills which they can use across subjects and in a variety of situations in post-16 and in the world of work. Students are encouraged to work independently to produce solutions to problems using a wide range of ICT software packages.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

One mandatory and one optional topics are covered in year 11:

  • Creating Digital Graphics (optional)
  • A Digital Portfolio (mandatory)

Both topics require students to analyse a problem, plan and design, implement and test a digital product solution.

Assessment:

All topics are internally assessed and externally moderated. Students produce a portfolio of evidence, which is regularly assessed.

Students who are successful achieve the equivalent of a full GCSE which is graded at Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit, Level 2 Distinction, Level 2 Distinction*, Level 1 and Unclassified.

Homework:

Homework is set once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to help year 11 students to practice the IT skills and to make progress on their coursework.


Faculty Introduction:

Year 10 Business students follow the GCSE Business Studies course. This course is designed to deepen candidates' understanding of the way in which businesses operate in a dynamic, changing and competitive environment. The course complements and extends the areas of experience covered by other subjects, notably economics and geography, by providing an important context in which to study resource allocation. It enriches candidates' understanding and awareness of citizenship by examining business from a range of stakeholder perspectives. It requires candidates to recognise that there is a spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural dimension to business decision-making.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

The Business Framework: Different business objectives including survival, profit maximisation (the reward for risk taking), growth, increased market share and operating ethically and in a sustainable manner considering why these objectives are set and how they can be achieved. Businesses and their Customers: The interdependence between businesses their customers, and the importance and power of customers. Candidates will also learn how businesses identify customer needs and market their products and services effectively in a dynamic and competitive environment.

Producing Goods and Services: How businesses meet the needs and wants of consumers by providing goods and services and the need to operate efficiently and provide quality products at optimum locations, locally, nationally and internationally.

Assessment:

This is a linear specification in which all assessments are taken at the end of the course in year 11. The course is assessed through an external examination and controlled assessment. External assessment accounts for 75% of the marks and controlled assessment for 25% of the marks. All other activities during teaching and learning are assessed using the college’s CAR marking policy.

Homework:

Homework is set once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to provide further support for students.


Faculty Introduction:

Year 11 Business students follow the GCSE Business Studies course. This course is designed to deepen candidates' understanding of the way in which businesses operate in a dynamic, changing and competitive environment. The course complements and extends the areas of experience covered by other subjects, notably economics and geography, by providing an important context in which to study resource allocation. It enriches candidates' understanding and awareness of citizenship by examining business from a range of stakeholder perspectives. It requires candidates to recognise that there is a spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural dimension to business decision-making.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Students will learn the following topics in year 10

The Business Framework: Different business objectives including survival, profit maximisation (the reward for risk taking), growth, increased market share and operating ethically and in a sustainable manner considering why these objectives are set and how they can be achieved. Businesses and their Customers: The interdependence between businesses their customers, and the importance and power of customers. Candidates will also learn how businesses identify customer needs and market their products and services effectively in a dynamic and competitive environment.

Producing Goods and Services: How businesses meet the needs and wants of consumers by providing goods and services and the need to operate efficiently and provide quality products at optimum locations, locally, nationally and internationally.

Assessment:

This is a linear specification in which all assessments are taken at the end of the course in year 11. The course is assessed through an external examination and controlled assessment. External assessment accounts for 75% of the marks and controlled assessment for 25% of the marks. All other activities during teaching and learning are assessed using the college’s CAR marking policy.

Homework:

Homework is set once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to provide further support for students.


Faculty Introduction:

This qualification is designed for learners who are interested in an introduction to the study of creating IT systems to manage and share information, alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses.

During the two year course students will have to choose and complete a range of units, be organised, take some assessments that we will set and marked, and keep a portfolio of assignments as part of coursework. The course is suitable for all students who can:

  • Work to deadlines
  • Show a high level of commitment to their studies
  • Follow precise instructions
  • Work independently
  • Take responsibility for their own learning

What will I learn?

The Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Information Technology qualification is a 360GLH course which is equivalent in size to one A Level. Students will cover 4 units of which 3 are mandatory and 2 are external. The mandatory content accounts for 83% of the course while the external assessment accounts for 58%.

The following are a range of topics that may be covered over the 2-year duration of the course

  • Information Technology Systems
  • Creating Systems to Manage Information
  • Using Social Media in Business
  • Website Development
  • Data Modelling

Assessment:

Assessment is specifically designed to fit the purpose and objective of the qualification. There are three main forms of assessment external, internal and synoptic. External assessment take the form of examinations where all learners take the same assessment at the same time with a written outcome, and set tasks where learners take the assessment during a defined window and demonstrate understanding through completion of a vocational task. Internal assessment on the other hand is carried out by the responsible teacher and is subject to external standards verification.

Homework:

Homework is regularly set and assessments are returned to students within one week of completion. Marking follows the College’s CAR marking policy.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

There are lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to help Sixth Form students to practice their IT skills and to make progress on their coursework.

Progression routes and Career Opportunities:

Students completing their BTEC Nationals in Information Technology will be aiming to go on to employment, often via the stepping stone of higher education including university.


Faculty Introduction:

This qualification is designed to support learners who are interested in learning about the computing sector alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses.

During the two year course students will have to choose and complete a range of units, be organised, take some assessments that we will set and marked, and keep a portfolio of assignments as part of coursework. The course is suitable for all students who can:

  • Work to deadlines
  • Show a high level of commitment to their studies
  • Follow precise instructions
  • Work independently
  • Take responsibility for their own learning

What will I learn?

The Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Computing qualification is a 360GLH course which is equivalent in size to one A Level. Students will cover 4 units of which 3 are mandatory and 2 are external. The mandatory content accounts for 83% of the course while the external assessment accounts for 58%.

The following are a range of topics that may be covered over the 2-year duration of the course

  • Principles of Computer Science
  • Fundamentals of Computer Systems
  • IT Systems Security and Encryption
  • Human-computer Interaction
  • Digital Graphics and Animation
  • Computer Games Development
  • Website Development
  • Mobile Apps Development
  • Managing and Supporting Systems
  • Systems Analysis and Design

Assessment:

Assessment is specifically designed to fit the purpose and objective of the qualification. There are three main forms of assessment external, internal and synoptic. External assessment take the form of examinations where all learners take the same assessment at the same time with a written outcome, and set tasks where learners take the assessment during a defined window and demonstrate understanding through completion of a vocational task. Internal assessment on the other hand is carried out by the responsible teacher and is subject to external standards verification.

Progression routes and Career Opportunities:

Students completing their BTEC Nationals in Information Technology will be aiming to go on to employment, often via the stepping stone of higher education including university.


Faculty Introduction:

Year 12 Business Studies students follow the AQA Business Studies course. This course is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of the internal functions of a contemporary business of all types of ownership. As well as an understanding of how the business is influenced by the external environment. The course aims to be an active learning experience which complements a range of other subjects. Business Studies draws on the candidate’s numeracy and literacy skills.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Students will learn the following topics in year 12

Planning and Financing a business : This unit covers the issues involved in a business start-up, such as research and planning, as well as the factors that determine success. Managing a Businesses and their Customers: focuses on how established businesses might improve their effectiveness by making tactical decisions at a functional level.

Assessment:

This is a modular specification in which candidates sit two public examinations at the end of the AS year. All other activities during teaching and learning are assessed using the college’s CAR marking policy.

Homework:

Homework is set at least once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Students will also receive self study tasks which students are expected to complete on a weekly basis. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs intervention and enrichment sessions at lunch times and after school throughout the week.


Faculty Introduction:

Year 12 Economics students follow the AQA Economics course. This course is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of how markets operate and their impact on economic agents. Students will also investigate the wider economy in terms of it macroeconomic performance. The course aims to be an active learning experience which complements a range of other subjects. Business Studies draws on the candidate’s numeracy and literacy skills.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Students will learn the following topics in year 12

Unit 1: Markets and Market Failure

Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of some basic microeconomic models such as demand and supply and the price mechanism. Student will investigate how markets fail to operate fully and efficiently and what policies could be used to correct it.

Unit 2: The National Economy

Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of AD/AS analysis and will use this to explore recent and current economic behaviour. They investigate and evaluate, macroeconomic policy relating to unemployment, inflation, economic growth and balance of payments.

Assessment:

This is a modular specification in which candidates sit two public examinations at the end of the AS year. All other activities during teaching and learning are assessed using the college’s CAR marking policy.

Homework:

Homework is set at least once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Students will also receive self study tasks which students are expected to complete on a weekly basis. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to provide further support for students


Faculty Introduction:

Year 13 Business Studies students follow the AQA Business Studies course. This course is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of the internal functions of a contemporary business of all types of ownership. As well as an understanding of how the business is influenced by the external environment. The course aims to be an active learning experience which complements a range of other subjects. Business Studies draws on the candidate’s numeracy and literacy skills.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Students will learn the following topics in year 13

Strategies for Success: Focuses on larger businesses which may be trading in international markets, and how managers might measure the performance of the business. This unit considers functional strategies that larger businesses may adopt to achieve their objectives. The Business environment and Managing change: Assesses the external factors that can act as catalysts for change, and considers these in relation to a range of businesses. This unit also examines the ways in which businesses can manage change successfully when responding to external stimuli.

Assessment:

This is a modular specification in which candidates sit two public examinations at the end of the A2 year. All other activities during teaching and learning are assessed using the college’s CAR marking policy.

Homework:

Homework is set at least once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Students will also receive self study tasks which students are expected to complete on a weekly basis. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs intervention and enrichment sessions at lunch times and after school throughout the week.


Faculty Introduction:

Year 13 Economics students follow the AQA Economics course. This course is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of how markets operate and their impact on economic agents. Students will also investigate the wider economy in terms of it macroeconomic performance. The course aims to be an active learning experience which complements a range of other subjects. Business Studies draws on the candidate’s numeracy and literacy skills.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

In year 13 students will learn the following topics in the context of the European Union and Globalisation.

Unit 3 Business Economics and the Distribution of Income

This module builds on the module one and requires students to study microeconomic models; such as example, perfect competition, monopoly and oligopoly. Students will need to evaluate them in terms of efficiency. Students will also investigate the operations of the labour market and the factors which influence relative wage rates, poverty and the distribution of income and wealth.

Unit 4 The National and International Economy

This module builds on the AD/AS analysis from Unit 2 be able to analyse and evaluate the causes of changes in macroeconomic indicators in greater depth with the key focus on the consequences of changes in macroeconomic indicators.

Assessment:

This is a modular specification in which candidates sit two public examinations at the end of the A2 year. All other activities during teaching and learning are assessed using the college’s CAR marking policy.

Homework:

Homework is set at least once a week and students are required to hand in on the due date. Students will also receive self study tasks which students are expected to complete on a weekly basis. Homework is either teacher or peer assessed on a regular basis.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The faculty runs a G& T club as part of the whole school G & T provision. There are also lunch time clubs which run throughout the week to provide further support for students

Last updated: 13 Nov 2017