Please click on the year below to view course content for the History Faculty.


Faculty Introduction:

The History department aims to provide a stimulating and rewarding Historical experience for all and helps students become thoughtful historians and independent thinkers who are able to express themselves clearly and respectfully. We see our key objectives as:

  1. To help students to develop Historical knowledge and understanding.
  2. To introduce students to historical enquiry and develop the skills of chronology, causation, interpretation, critical thinking and extended writing.
  3. To help students to develop a sense of identity through learning about the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world, and to help them to develop their own informed opinions and attitudes.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Unit 1: What is History?

An introductory unit of work on historical skills. Students should be introduced to the key processes of chronology, enquiry and using evidence.

  • What is history?
  • What is chronology?
  • What is evidence?
  • How do we use sources?
  • What happened to the Tolland man?

Unit 2: Medieval Realms Britain 1066-1500

  • What would the Middle Ages have been like to live in?
  • Should the King of England be English?
  • How did William keep his crown?
  • In what ways did the medieval Church control ideas?
  • Why is Thomas Becket a saint and Henry a sinner?
  • How well did medieval monarchs keep control?
  • How fair was life in the Middle Ages?
  • How did the Black Death change peoples’ lives?
  • Why were the peasants revolting?
  • Why did the pope send children to fight a war?
  • Why did castle defences change in the Middle Ages?

Unit3: Pirates!

  • How far was Jack Sparrow like a real Pirate?

Homework:

There should be 2 or 3 such common assessed assignments per term. These are marked according to an agreed mark scheme and assessed assignments should cover all Concepts / Processes / Skills in the course of each academic year and be mapped across KS3 to build progression.

  1. Baseline Assessment
  2. Chronology Test
  3. Bog Body police report
  4. Causation Essay on Why William won Battle of Hastings
  5. Enquiry source investigation: Police report on Thomas Becket
  6. Interpretation source work on King John
  7. A Day in the Life of a Peasant
  8. Was the Black Death a disaster? Historical Story (interpretation and communication)
  9. How typical was Kenilworth Castle? (Site Investigation and using evidence)
  10. Source Enquiry Project: How far were real pirates like Captain Jack Sparrow?

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The History department run sessions for G&T students as part of the whole school G&T club. We also try to run a visit for year 7 students to Kenilworth Castle in term 6. Humanities Heroes are awarded 3 times a year.


Faculty Introduction:

The History department aims to provide a stimulating and rewarding Historical experience for all and helps students become thoughtful historians and independent thinkers who are able to express themselves clearly and respectfully. We see our key objectives as:

  1. To help students to develop Historical knowledge and understanding.
  2. To introduce students to historical enquiry and develop the skills of chronology, causation, interpretation, critical thinking and extended writing. To help students to develop a sense of identity through learning about the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world, and to help them to develop their own informed opinions and attitudes.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Unit 4: Making of the UK Britain 1500 - 1750

  • Would you have liked to have lived in the 1500s?
  • Why did Christians argue with each other?
  • How far was Henry VIII a monster?
  • How far did Edward and Mary change religion?
  • Why was Elizabeth I a successful queen?
  • How much of a threat to James I was the Gunpowder Plot?
  • Why did King Charles I go to war with his own parliament?
  • What effect did the Civil War have on soldiers and civilians?
  • Why did England execute their King?
  • What were the consequences of life without a King?
  • Was life in the seventeenth century more superstitious or scientific?
  • How did the Great Plague and Fire affect London in the 1660’s?
  • How united was the United Kingdom?

Unit 5: Black Peoples of the Americas Slavery to Civil Rights

  • What was life like for Black people before slavery?
  • Was there a Typical Slave?
  • Did Abolition lead to Freedom?
  • How significant was the USA Civil Rights Movement?

Assessment:

There should be 2 or 3 such common assessed assignments per term. These are marked according to an agreed mark scheme and assessed assignments should cover all Concepts / Processes / Skills in the course of each academic year and be mapped across KS3 to build progression.

  1. To what extent was 1500 a good time to live in England?
  2. News report obituary on Henry VIII: How far was Henry VIII a monster?
  3. Should Mary Queen of Scots be executed?
  4. Interpretation of Elizabeth I portraits
  5. Were the Catholics framed? Gunpowder Plot
  6. Causation essay on reasons for Civil War
  7. Empathy news account of Charles I’s trial
  8. Cromwell: Hero or Villain?
  9. Source Enquiry Project: Was there a “typical” slave?
  10. “Wilberforce was the most influential individual in abolishing slavery”. How far do you agree?

Homework:

The department follows the whole college homework policy. The Department sets regular homework for all students in Years 8. Parental co-operation is valued. Homework tasks are varied and can include reading, research, writing, learning, collecting information. Homework is of particular value in History as it is a good way of helping students realise that History happens outside the classroom and affects current affairs. The students will be set independent project homework in term 6 on a ‘typical slave’.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The History department run sessions for G&T students as part of the whole school G&T club. We also try to run a visit for year 8 students the Back Country during term 6 in preparation for the year 9 course. Humanities Heroes are awarded 3 times a year.


Faculty Introduction:

The History department aims to provide a stimulating and rewarding Historical experience for all and helps students become thoughtful historians and independent thinkers who are able to express themselves clearly and respectfully. We see our key objectives as:

  1. To help students to develop Historical knowledge and understanding.
  2. To introduce students to historical enquiry and develop the skills of chronology, causation, interpretation, critical thinking and extended writing. To help students to develop a sense of identity through learning about the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world, and to help them to develop their own informed opinions and attitudes.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Unit 6: Britain 1750-1900

  • What changed between 1750 and 1900?
  • Industry and factories: good or bad for Britain?
  • Who was Jack the Ripper?
  • Why did it take so long for ordinary people to gain the vote?
  • Why were the railways important?
  • Was the British Empire “A Good Thing”?

Unit 7: Twentieth Century World

  • How did murder lead to a world war in 1914?
  • How far was the Great War great?
  • Why did it take so long for women to gain the vote?
  • Was the USA stable in the 1920s?
  • Why did the dictators rise during the 1930s?
  • How far was Hitler responsible for WW2?
  • What was it like to live through WW2?
  • Why should we remember the Holocaust?
  • How did the empire create multicultural Britain?
  • How close did the Cold War come to becoming Hot?
  • Who killed JFK?
  • How far is the twentieth century a better place to live?
  • Unit 8: Modern History and the Middle East

  • How far is religion the most important reason for conflict in the Middle East?
  • This unit of work has been written to help students develop the skills needed for GCSE in year 10.

Assessment:

There should be 2 common assessed assignments per half term. These are marked according to an agreed mark scheme and assessed assignments should cover all Concepts / Processes / Skills in the course of each academic year and be mapped across KS3 to build progression. The last assessment develops the skills needed to complete exam questions at KS4.

  1. Causes of Industrial Revolution extended writing
  2. Factory conditions
  3. Jack the Ripper Police Report (Enquiry and Communication)
  4. Britain 1750-1900 End of Unit
  5. Causes of WW1 extended writing
  6. How useful is the film “All Quiet on the Western Front”? (using evidence)
  7. Why did women gain the vote? (Interpretations and using evidence)
  8. How far was Hitler responsible for WW2? (Role of individual / significance)
  9. How far was Dunkirk a disaster?
  10. How far is religion the most important reason for conflict in the Middle East?

Homework:

The department follows the whole college homework policy. The Department sets regular homework for all students in Years 9. Parental co-operation is valued. Homework tasks are varied and can include reading, research, writing, learning, collecting information. Homework is of particular value in History as it is a good way of helping students realise that History happens outside the classroom and affects current affairs. The students will be set independent extended writing homework in term 6 to help them develop the skills required for GCSE.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The History department run sessions for G&T students as part of the whole school G&T club. We also try to run a visit for G&T year 9 students to the Sessions House during term 3 in order for students to re-enact a real life trial. An educational visit to see the World War One trenches has also been popular with our year 9’s. Humanities Heroes are awarded 3 times a year.


Faculty Introduction:

History helps you to develop the skills of communication, working with others, problem solving, and critical thinking, organising and evaluating information and drawing conclusions. History is a broad subject that enables you to acquire the skills employers look for: the ability to assess, analyse, communicate, write reports and make presentations. History can lead to careers in areas such as law, journalism and education.

If you choose to study History at KS4 we follow the OCR History B Schools History Project Full Course (J411)

Topics / Modules to be covered:

  1. Crime and Punishment c.1250 to present (exam course – thematic study 20%) The first unit of the GCSE course allows students to explore a theme over time.  This unit looks at attitudes to crime and punishment from the later Middle Ages to the present, including topics such as witchcraft, highway robbery, the death penalty, prisons and the police.
  2. The Norman Conquest, 1065–1087 (exam course – British depth study 20%) This depth study should enable learners to understand the complexity of the Norman Conquest and the interplay of political, military, religious, economic, social and cultural forces in England between 1065 and 1087. Topics include the battles of Stamford Bridge and Hastings, William’s “Harrying of the North”, Norman castles and the Domesday Book.
  3. Site investigation of Rockingham Castle (exam course – History Around Us 20%) This unit is a site investigation allowing students to examine evidence for themselves to draw conclusions about change and continuity over time and the usefulness and reliability of sources of evidence.

Assessment:

  • British History Paper (Component Group 1 – 1 hour 45 minutes) 40% – assessing the Crime and Punishment and Norman Conquest units (taught in Y10)
  • History Around Us (Component Group 2 – 1 hour) 20% - assessing the Rockingham Castle site study (taught in Y10)
  • World History Paper (Component Group 3 – 1 hour 45 minutes) 40% - assessing the Making of America and Living Under Nazi Rule units (taught in Y11)

Homework:

Homework at KS4 is still set in line with whole school policy. Parental co-operation is valued. We still aim to set a range of tasks and can include reading, research, writing, learning, collecting information. Homework is also a good opportunity for students to reflect on the comments made by their teachers and improve or re-attempt work as necessary. Independent reading and lots of revision is also encouraged.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

Compulsory visit to Rockingham Castle for the examination. Sessions for G&T students as part of the whole school G&T club.


Faculty Introduction:

History helps you to develop the skills of communication, working with others, problem solving, and critical thinking, organising and evaluating information and drawing conclusions. History is a broad subject that enables you to acquire the skills employers look for: the ability to assess, analyse, communicate, write reports and make presentations. History can lead to careers in areas such as law, journalism and education.

If you choose to study History at KS4 we follow the OCR Schools History Project A Full Course (J415)

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Crime and Punishment Through Time (development study)

The final unit of the GCSE course allows students to explore a theme over time. This unit looks at attitudes to crime and punishment from the Romans to the Twentieth Century.

  • Romans
  • Middle Ages
  • Early modern Britain
  • Industrial Britain
  • 20th Century

In each time period we look at crimes, policing trials and punishments and protest tracking the changes and continuities over time.

Assessment:

In class:

  1. Baseline – Germany Paper 1
  2. Romans – past paper 1 and 2 questions and knowledge test
  3. Middle Ages – past paper 1 and 2 questions and knowledge test
  4. Mock Exam (P1 and P2)
  5. Early Modern – past paper 1 and 2 questions and knowledge test
  6. 1750-1900 – past paper 1 and 2 questions and knowledge test
  7. 20th Century – past paper 1 and 2 questions and knowledge test

External exams:

  • Controlled assessment counts for 25% of the final grade
  • Paper 1 is a knowledge and understanding exam counting for 45% of the final grade
  • Paper 2 is a source based exam counting for 30% of the final grade

Homework:

Homework at KS4 is still set in line with whole school policy. Parental co-operation is valued. We still aim to set a range of tasks and can include reading, research, writing, learning, collecting information. Homework is also a good opportunity for students to reflect on the comments made by their teachers and improve or re-attempt work as necessary. Independent reading and lots of revision is also encouraged.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

Revision sessions run every Wednesday after school in the lead up to mock and final exams. Sessions for G&T students as part of the whole school G&T club. On alternate years we try to run a Humanities G&T trip.


Faculty Introduction:

History equips you with knowledge and skills which are highly valued by universities and employers. The ability to study History shows that you are capable of analysis, clear presentation, discussion, group work, individual study and research from books, databases and the Internet. The study of History enables you to think critically and question both the past and the world around you. Our aim is to create independent learners, critical thinkers and decision-makers – all personal assets that can make students stand out as they progress to higher education or the workplace.

If you choose to study History at A level we follow the OCR History A H505.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Unit 1: England 1547–1603: the Later Tudors (Enquiry topic: Mid Tudor Crises 1547–1558) (Y107)
This unit has 2 elements - a British period study and enquiry. The document enquiry is focused on Mid-Tudor Crises in Edward VI and Mary I’s reigns 1547-1558 and includes the stability of the monarchy; religious changes; rebellion and unrest. Assessment involves the critical use of sources of evidence. The essay-based period study is focused on Elizabeth I’s reign 1558-1603 and includes religion; the nature of government and parliament; economic and social affairs; Elizabethan later years 1588-1603.

Unit 2: The Cold War in Asia 1945–1993 (Y222)
This unit is a non-British period study that includes western policies in post-war Asia 1945-79; the Korean War 1950-53 and its impact to 1977; Indochina 1945-67; Wars in Vietnam and Cambodia 1968-93. It is assessed by essay questions and shorter questions on the significance of events.

Unit 3: Civil Rights in the USA 1865–1992 (Y319)
This unit has 2 elements - a thematic study and historical interpretations depth study. The essay-based thematic study covers an extended period of over 100 years; the depth study involves evaluating historians’ interpretations of events within this period. The study includes the position of African Americans, Native Americans, women and Trade Union and Labour rights.

Unit 4: Topic based essay (Y100)
This is the internally assessed element of the course and provides students with the opportunity to explore a topic of personal interest through independently researched coursework.

Assessment:

Unit 1: England 1547-1603 the Later Tudors (Y107) is worth 25% of the course.
Assessed by a 1 hour 30 minutes written exam paper. One period study essay from a choice of two; one document-based enquiry question.

Unit 2: The Cold War in Asia 1945-1993 (Y222) is worth 15% of the course.
Assessed by a 1 hour written exam paper. Students answer both parts from one of the two questions set: Shorter questions on the significance of events; and then one period study essay question.

Unit 3: Civil Rights in the USA 1865-1992 (Y319) is worth 40% of the course.
Assessed by a 2 hour 30 minute written exam paper. Two theme questions from a choice of three, all covering 100 years; one interpretations question.

Unit 4: Topic based essay (Y100) is worth 20% of the A Level.
A 3,000-4,000 word personal study essay. A personal and independently researched investigation of the student’s choice.

Homework:

The History Department aims to set at least three written assessed tasks (i.e. essays or exam questions) per half term. A Level students are also set ongoing reading, research, several formats of writing and revision tasks that support class work. A Level Historians are advised to complete a minimum of six hours of private study per week.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

The History Department runs revision sessions and supports G&T students with applications to university. We run trips that fit with the specification of the examination course, such as the trip to the Tower of London.

Last updated: 10 Oct 2017