Please click on the year below to view course content for the English Faculty.

Learning Director
Ms Kinsella -


Faculty Introduction:

The Year 7 curriculum in English is vibrant and challenging. We look to develop the students’ core skills, building on their primary years and refining it above and beyond this level. We challenge the students to improve the three most significant areas of English and literacy - reading, writing and communication. Through different mediums such as: non-fiction; Shakespeare; prose; poetry and media texts we push the students to broaden their horizons and prepare them for the rigours of GCSE in the long term.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

A wide range of different topics are covered across an academic year. Due to the nature of the curriculum this can change year on year, however in the past academic year we have focused on: an introduction to Shakespeare; prose texts such as ‘The Midnight Zoo’; poetry from the 1900s; exploring non-fiction texts based on the upcoming GCSE specification; media texts such as’ Jurassic Park’ and Gothic writing from Edgar Allen Poe.

Assessment:

Students will complete at least one major Formative and a Summative assessment across each Unit. These assessments are mapped to each unit to ensure coverage of all appropriate Reading and Writing skills. Students are currently assessed against the GCSE criteria. CAR marking is used to inform progress in line with College policy.

Homework:

Homework is built into the schemes of work and should be set on a weekly basis. The homework is differentiated according to ability and assessed using CAR marking in line with College policy.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

We offer many opportunities for students to develop their writing skills through entry to national writing competitions such as Young Writers and pride ourselves on the success of our students in becoming published writers. A 'Drop and Read' club is available to all Year 7 students to assist with any students who need further support in reading.


Faculty Introduction:

The Year 8 curriculum in English builds upon the solid foundations set out in Year 7. We look to further develop the students’ core reading and writing skills by focusing on developing those key GCSE elements such as: reading for inference, developing deduction skills and completing close analysis of language and writer’s methodology. We continue to challenging students to improve the three most significant areas of English and literacy - reading, writing and communication. This occurs through different mediums such as: non-fiction; Shakespeare; prose; poetry and media texts. Thus challenging students to broaden their horizons whilst preparing them for the rigours of GCSE in the long term.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

A wide range of different topics and genres are studied across an academic year. Due to the nature of the curriculum this can change year on year. However, in the past academic year we have focused on: Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’; prose texts such as ‘Private Peaceful’; poetry from the GCSE ‘Conflict’ cluster; exploring non-fiction texts based on the upcoming GCSE specification and various media texts.

Assessment:

Students will complete at least one major Formative and a Summative assessment across each Unit. These assessments are mapped to each unit to ensure coverage of all appropriate Reading and Writing skills. Students are currently assessed against the GCSE criteria. CAR marking is used to inform progress in line with College policy.

Homework:

Homework is built into the schemes of work and should be set on a weekly basis. The homework is differentiated according to ability and assessed using CAR marking in line with College policy.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

We offer many opportunities for students to develop their writing skills through entry to national writing competitions such as Young Writers and pride ourselves on the success of our students in becoming published writers.


Faculty Introduction:

The Year 9 curriculum in English builds upon the solid foundations set out in Year 8 and is a preparation for GCSE. We look to further develop the students’ core reading and writing skills by focusing on developing those key GCSE elements such as: reading for inference, developing deduction skills and completing close analysis of language and writer’s methodology. We continue to challenging students to improve the three most significant areas of English and literacy - reading, writing and communication. This occurs through different mediums such as: non-fiction; Shakespeare; prose; poetry and media texts. Thus challenging students to broaden their horizons whilst preparing them for the rigours of GCSE.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

A wide range of different topics and genres are studied across an academic year. Due to the nature of the curriculum this can change year on year. However, in the past academic year we have focused on: Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’; prose texts such as ‘The Hunger Games’ ; poetry by Carol Ann Duffy and Simon Armitage as well as pre-1914 poetry; exploring non-fiction texts based on the upcoming GCSE specification and various media texts.

Assessment:

Students will complete at least one major Formative and a Summative assessment across each Unit. These assessments are mapped to each unit to ensure coverage of all appropriate Reading and Writing skills. Students are currently assessed against the GCSE criteria. CAR marking is used to inform progress in line with College policy.

Homework:

Homework is built into the schemes of work and should be set on a weekly basis. The homework is differentiated according to ability and assessed using CAR marking in line with College policy.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

We offer many opportunities for students to develop their writing skills through entry to national writing competitions such as Young Writers and pride ourselves on the success of our students in becoming published writers.


Faculty Introduction:

GCSE English Language is a two year course covering years 10 and 11 in which all students follow the AQA English Language route. Students will develop the ability to communicate clearly, accurately and effectively when speaking and writing. They will also develop their ability to analyse, infer and present opinions effectively. We encourage students to read widely, both for their own enjoyment and to further their awareness of the ways in which English can be used.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Students will cover a range of topics and texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st century time periods as well as focus on being able to write clearly, coherently and accurately using a range of vocabulary and sentence structures. Students will draw upon a range of texts as reading stimulus and engage with creative as well as real and relevant contexts. Students will have opportunities to develop higher-order reading and critical thinking skills that encourage genuine enquiry into different topics and themes.

Assessment:

Students will all be assessed through external examinations at the end of the course sitting two papers. Throughout the course students will complete formative and summative assessments each term which will be assessed by their class teacher. These will allow staff to monitor the progress of students in line with exam board requirements.

Homework:

Homework is set and marked regularly by class teachers and students are expected to stick to deadlines set for them.


Faculty Introduction:

Our GCSE English Literature students are given the opportunity to immerse themselves in the world of Literature throughout the duration of their two year study period. Students will explore and analyse different forms of prose, drama and poetry for various time periods and cultures. This cross curricular subject will enhance students’ historical knowledge as they will travel back to World War One and then be transported forwards into the twisted plots of modern murder mysteries. This course will be invigorating and inspiring.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

A Students will study a Shakespeare play, a 19th century novel, modern drama and poetry. Texts are subject to change but students currently study:

  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  • The Sign of Four by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • An Inspector Calls by J.B. Priestley

In preparation for the poetry element of the course students will study poems from a collection called Power and Conflict from AQA’s Past and Present Anthology as well as unseen poetry.

Assessment:

Students will all be assessed through external examinations at the end of the course sitting two papers. Throughout the course students will complete formative and summative assessments each term which will be assessed by their class teacher. These will allow staff to monitor the progress of students in line with exam board requirements.

Homework:

Homework will be set and CAR marked in line with College policy. It will aim to enable students to become independent in research skills and their application in their production work and in developing their own views and interpretations of individual case studies across the full range of media industries.


Faculty Introduction:

The aim of A Level English Language is to enable students to build on the skills they've developed at GCSE, by engaging creatively and critically with a wide range of texts and discourses. Students will be introduced to exciting and relevant text and data-based sources to inspire their study of English Language. The course will introduce the study of English in its various forms and contexts, with the concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis of language underpinning all elements of the course.

The variety of assessment styles used, such as data analysis, discursive essays, directed writing, original writing and research-based investigative writing, allows students to develop a wide range of skills. These include critical reading, data analysis, evaluation, the ability to develop and sustain arguments and a number of different writing skills which are invaluable for both further study and future employment.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Through Year 12 and 13 students will cover the following units:

  • Textual variations and representations
  • Child language development
  • Language diversity
  • Language change
  • Language in action: a language investigation
  • Original writing

Assessment:

The A-level specification is designed to be taken over two years with all assessments taken at the end of the course. The exams and non-exam assessment will measure to what extent students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

  • AO1: Apply appropriate methods of language analysis, using associated terminology and coherent written expression.
  • AO2: Demonstrate critical understanding of concepts and issues relevant to language use.
  • AO3: Analyse and evaluate how contextual factors and language features are associated with the construction of meaning.
  • AO4: Explore connections across texts, informed by linguistic concepts and methods.
  • AO5: Demonstrate expertise and creativity in the use of English to communicate in different ways.

Paper 1: Language, the Individual and Society – 2 hours 30 minutes

  • Section A: Textual Variations and Representations
  • Section B: Children’s Language Development

Paper 2: Language Diversity and Change – 2 hours 30 minutes

  • Section A: Diversity and Change
  • Section B: Language Discourses.

Non-exam assessment: Language in Action

  • This consists of an investigation, original writing and a commentary.

Homework:

Homework will be set and CAR marked in line with College policy. It will aim to enable students to become independent in research skills and to engage creatively and critically with a wide range of texts and discourses. Students will be given formative feedback throughout the duration of the course and they will be expected to respond to their teachers’ feedback in order to improve their written and analytical skills.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

Students will be given the opportunity, where available, to attend lectures by a range of leading linguists, including those given at the British Library.  They will be exposed to a huge variety of wider reading, including coverage of the most up to date research in relation to all aspects of linguistics.   Students will be encouraged to develop their own research and investigative skills in relation to a huge range of written and spoken texts, including those written as early as the 1700s.


Faculty Introduction:

The aim of A Level English Literature is to develop students as informed and independent readers of a variety of genres of texts. Students will study prose, drama and poetry all linked to the theme of ‘Love through the Ages’ and explore the portrayal of love ranging from the 16th century and extending to the 21st century; students will study how the complexity of love has been conveyed through Literature and will be able to link this to different relationships and contexts. They will develop comparison skills and a coherent understanding of the social and historical context which influences texts as well as developing analytical skills and the ability to approach familiar texts and unseen literature with confidence.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

Through Year 12, students will study four core texts;

  • William Shakespeare’s ‘Othello’
  • F.Scott Fitzgerald’s ‘The Great Gatsby’
  • A pre-1900 Poetry anthology
  • Thomas Hardy’s ‘Tess of the D’Ubervilles’.

They will also study Tennessee William’s ‘A Streetcar named Desire’ and Oscar Wilde’s ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ in preparation for their Non Examined Assessment (NEA) in Year 13. At the end of Year 12, they will sit the AS examination (which is awarded a grade at AS but does not contribute to the overall A level). This consists of two papers, each worth 50% of the overall grade, which require students to analyse texts they have studied as well as unseen extracts.

Assessment:

Paper 1 — 90 minutes, closed book. 50% of AS (does not count towards A level)

  • Section A: Passage based question on ‘Othello’.
  • Section B: poetry question on a poem from the anthology.

Paper 2 – 90 minutes, open book. 50% of AS (does not count towards A level)

  • Section A: Response to an unseen prose extract.
  • Section B: comparison of ‘Tess of the D’Ubervilles’ and ‘The Great Gatsby’.

Homework:

Homework will be set and CAR marked in line with College policy. It will aim to enable students to become independent in research skills and their application in their production work and in developing their own views and interpretations of individual case studies across the full range of media industries. Students will be given formative feedback throughout the duration of the course and they will be expected to response to their teachers’ feedback in order to improve their written and analytical skills.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

Students will be given the opportunity, where available, to attend performances of key texts. They will be exposed to a huge variety of wider reading and encouraged to develop their knowledge of context and tradition. They will also have the opportunity to become involved in shadow judging the BBC Short Story competition and develop their own writing skills through after-school sessions.


Faculty Introduction:

The aim of A Level English Literature is to develop students as informed and independent readers of a variety of genres of texts. Students will study prose, drama and poetry all linked to the theme of ‘Love through the Ages’ and explore the portrayal of love ranging from the 16th century and extending to the 21st century; students will study how the complexity of love has been conveyed through Literature and will be able to link this to different relationships and contexts. They will develop comparison skills and a coherent understanding of the social and historical context which influences texts as well as developing analytical skills and the ability to approach familiar texts and unseen literature with confidence. ‘Love through the Ages’ will have been studied in Year 12 but examined at the end of Year 13.

They will also study a variety of genres of texts within the time period of World War One. Students will study prose, drama and poetry produced at the time. They will develop comparison skills and a coherent understanding of the social and historical context of World War One. Students will explore literature written from both the male and female perspective as well as from a variety of time periods in order to gain a true understanding of how conflict impacted a range of individuals.

In the examination, candidates will respond both to their prepared texts and unseen extracts.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

The ‘Love through the Ages’ texts will be studied in Year 12 and revised and examined in Year 13.

Through Year 13, students will study the set texts for the examination and work with unseen extracts and wider reading to support their analysis, comparison and contextual understanding.

They will complete a piece of NEA which will compare two texts.

Assessment:

Paper 1 – 3 hours, open book for section C. 40% of overall A level.

  • Section A: passage based question on ‘Othello’
  • Section B: comparison of two unseen poems
  • Section C: Comparison between poems from the pre-1900 anthology and ‘The Great Gatsby’

Paper 2 – 2 hours 30 minutes, open book. 40% of overall A level.

  • Section A: question on ‘Up the Line to Death’
  • Section B: analysis of unseen prose
  • Section C: Comparison of ‘Birdsong’ and ‘My Boy Jack’

One piece of Non Examined Assessment (NEA) – comparing ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ and ‘A Streetcar named Desire’. 20% of overall mark.

Homework:

Homework will be set and CAR marked in line with College policy. It will aim to enable students to become independent in research skills and their application in their production work and in developing their own views and interpretations of individual case studies across the full range of media industries. Students will be given formative feedback throughout the duration of the course and they will be expected to response to their teachers’ feedback in order to improve their written and analytical skills.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

Students will be given the opportunity, where available, to attend performances of key texts. They will be exposed to a huge variety of wider reading and encouraged to develop their knowledge of context and tradition. They will also have the opportunity to become involved in shadow judging the BBC Short Story competition and develop their own writing skills through after-school sessions.


Faculty Introduction:

AS Media Studies is designed to allow students to draw on their existing experience of the media and to develop their abilities to respond critically to a range of media industries. It enables students to explore how representations of a range of groups in society are constructed in a wide variety of media, including digital media technologies, drawing on the fundamental concepts informing the study of the media: texts, industry and audiences. It aims to:

  • enhance their enjoyment and appreciation of the media and its role in their daily lives
  • develop critical understanding of the media through engagement with media products and concepts and through the creative application of production skills
  • explore production processes, technologies and other relevant contexts
  • become independent in research skills and their application in their production work and in developing their own views and interpretations
  • The coursework element also encourages creative work to enable students to gain a greater appreciation of the media through their own production work and to develop their production skills.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

MS1: MEDIA REPRESENTATIONS AND RESPONSES

Introduction

This unit aims to provide candidates with a framework for analysing the media and requires them to explore representations and audience/user responses. Students will be encouraged to explore the media through a study of genre, narrative and representation and make connections between the texts and audience/user responses to them. In the developing area of interactive media, this involves considering users and their interaction with texts. Students will be provided with a range of examples which will enable them to understand and interpret the media independently. The representations of social/cultural groups, events, issues and their underlying messages and values will be explored using a range of approaches.

Content

Students will be required to study how media texts are constructed and how audiences and users respond to and interpret them using the following framework:

(a) Texts

  • genre conventions
  • narrative construction
  • technical codes such as camerawork, lighting, editing and sound for audio-visual media and graphic design elements for print-based and interactive media
  • language used and mode of address.

(b) Representations

  • the role of selection, construction and anchorage in creating representations
  • how the media uses representations
  • the points of view, messages and values underlying those representations.

Students will be study a range of representations of:

  • gender
  • ethnicity
  • age
  • issues
  • events
  • regional and national identities.

(c) Audience Responses

Students will be taught to consider the ways in which different audiences can respond to the same text in different ways. This will involve studying:

  • the ways in which audiences can be categorised (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, social & cultural background, advertisers' classifications)
  • how media producers and texts construct audiences and users
  • how audiences and users are positioned (including preferred, negotiated and oppositional responses to that positioning).

MS2: MEDIA PRODUCTION PROCESSES (Coursework)

Introduction:

This unit is designed to enable students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding and skills in media production processes through research, planning, production and evaluation.

Content - Candidates will be required to produce three pieces of linked work. These will comprise:

  • a pre-production reflecting research and demonstrating planning techniques
  • a production which has developed out of the pre-production
  • a report of 1200 - 1600 words.

It is anticipated that one brief will be set outlining pre-production and production tasks. Although there must be a link between pre-production and production, there is some flexibility in the nature of the tasks which can be set for pre-production and production. However, the production tasks must enable candidates to demonstrate competent technical skills.

(a) Pre-production - Pre-production work will focus on the research and planning skills needed to create media productions.

(b) Production - The production must develop out of the pre-production planning.

(c) Report - The pre-production and production must be accompanied by a report of 1200 – 1600 words.

Assessment:

MS1 Assessment

Students will be assessed by a written examination paper of two and a half hours, assessing AO1 and AO2. This will consist of three compulsory questions:

  • Question 1 requires an analysis of an audio/visual or print-based extract (40 marks).
  • Questions 2 and 3 will be based on representation and audience issues and may be subdivided where appropriate (30 and 30 marks).

Note: for questions 2 & 3, students will be expected to draw on their own studies of representation and audience response issues.

MS2 Assessment:

This unit will be internally assessed and externally moderated, assessing A02, A03 and A04, with the following mark allocations:

  • Pre-production (20 marks)
  • Production (40 marks)
  • Report of 1200-1600 words (40 marks)

Each of the three pieces of work will be assessed separately and then combined to achieve a total mark out of 100.

Homework:

Homework will be set and CAR marked in line with College policy. It will aim to enable students to become independent in research skills and their application in their production work and in developing their own views and interpretations of individual case studies across the full range of media industries.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:


Faculty Introduction:

A2 Media Studies is designed to develop students' understanding of the connections between different elements of the specification and to develop their knowledge and understanding of the relationship between media texts, their audiences and the industries which produce and distribute them. Progression from AS is demonstrated through this emphasis on the relationship between text, audience and industry and the debates surrounding the nature of that relationship. Students' understanding of the media will also be more informed by appropriate theoretical perspectives. It aims to:

  • enhance their enjoyment and appreciation of the media and its role in their daily lives
  • develop critical understanding of the media through engagement with media products and concepts and through the creative application of production skills
  • explore production processes, technologies and other relevant contexts
  • become independent in research skills and their application in their production work and in developing their own views and interpretations
  • The coursework element also encourages creative work to enable students to gain a greater appreciation of the media through their own production work and to develop their production skills.

Topics / Modules to be covered:

MS3: MEDIA INVESTIGATION AND PRODUCTION (Coursework)

Introduction

This unit develops the knowledge and skills acquired at AS and as such contributes to synoptic assessment. In particular, it is designed to demonstrate the importance of research in informing media production and to develop the skills acquired in MS2.

Content

Students are required to produce three pieces of linked work:

  • a research investigation (1400 – 1800 words)
  • a production (informed by the investigation)
  • a brief evaluation (500 – 750 words).

(a) Research Investigation

Students will be required to undertake an individual investigation into a specific area of study focused on one of the following concepts: genre, narrative or representation. Their research should draw on a range of both primary and secondary sources. It should enable students to reach conclusions that will inform their production.

Production

Students are required to submit a production which should develop from and be informed by the student’s research investigation. This production must be in a different form from the AS production.

Evaluation

The production must be accompanied by an individual evaluation which explores how the production has been informed by the research undertaken into the relevant media concept

.

MS4: MEDIA – TEXT, INDUSTRY AND AUDIENCE

Content

Students will study three different media industries from the list below:

  • Television
  • Film
  • Music
  • Newspaper
  • Magazine (including comics)
  • Advertising

For each industry, three main texts should provide the focus for students' study. At least two of the chosen texts must be contemporary and one must be British. Students will gain an understanding of the following:

  • Text
  • genre
  • narrative
  • representation

Industry

  • production
  • distribution (and exhibition where relevant)
  • marketing and promotion
  • regulation issues
  • global implications
  • relevant historical background

Audience

  • audience/user targeting
  • audience/user positioning
  • audience responses and user interaction
  • debates about the relationship between audiences/users and text

Assessment:

MS3:Assessment

This unit will be internally marked and externally moderated, assessing AO2, AO3 and AO4.

Students are required to submit:

  • a research investigation (1400 – 1800 words): 45 marks
  • a production (informed by the investigation): 45 marks
  • a brief evaluation (500 – 750 words): 10 marks

Each of the three pieces of work will be assessed separately and then combined to achieve a total mark for the unit.

MS4 Assessment

Students will complete a written examination of two and a half hours, assessing AO1 and AO2.

The paper will consist of two sections:

  • Section A will offer two questions based on media texts;
  • Section B will offer four questions based on industry and audience issues.

Students will be required to answer one question from Section A and two questions from Section B, using a different media industry for each answer. Each question will require them to make reference to the three main texts they have studied for each media industry and will be marked out of 30.

Homework:

Homework will be set and CAR marked in line with College policy. It will aim to enable students to become independent in research skills and their application in their production work and in developing their own views and interpretations of individual case studies across the full range of media industries.

Enhancement & Enrichment Activities:

Last updated: 12 Jul 2017